Showing Posts In "Criminal Records" Category





A New Study Shows Ban the Box Policies Are Working

The National Employment Law Project (NELP) notes that more than 150 cities in 28 states have adopted some version of Ban the Box laws, with similar laws expecting to be passed in additional cities and states. The goal of the law is to prevent employers from automatically disqualifying candidates with minor or irrelevant convictions without […]


Evaluating Job Applicants with Criminal Histories

Second chance hiring of job candidates with criminal records may provide benefits for both candidates and companies. The best way to see this through is to have a screening process that eliminates employment barriers based on eligible expungable or sealable criminal records. Expungement refers to erasing certain criminal records, while sealing a records typically means […]


Screen for Success: The Importance of Legal Compliance in the Hiring Process

While employment lawyers spend a substantial amount of time advising clients about legal issues arising out of employment separations, they receive far fewer requests for legal advice about the hiring process. Understanding the details of background screening becomes ever more important for employers operating across state lines, where various “ban the box” laws may exist. […]


When Banning One Kind of Discrimination Results in Another

While “ban the box” policies have enabled those with criminal backgrounds to be considered for employment, the law may be hurting the minority groups it is designed to protect. According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, the probability of hire is greatly reduced by the policy, which highlights certain groups. Read more


Hiring Policies: Ban the Box Adoption Grows

Since 2010, about 100 cities have adopted the “ban the box” laws, with 19 states adopting the policies for public employees, and seven of those removing the conviction history question on applications for private employers. Because supporters have argued that the use of background checks excludes many applicants because of their criminal history, other action […]


Update on Ban the Box Laws

The National Employment Law Project estimates that about 185 million U.S. citizen are living in the ban-the-box jurisdiction located in 24 states, with acceleration since 2010. Some jurisdictions, such as Hawaii, Minnesota and Washington, D.C., have developed their own versions of the law, like those that include a prohibition for private employers, removal of the […]


Hiring Policies Ban the Box Adaptation Grows

The country’s implementation of the Ban the Box laws have steadily been on the rise since 2010, when only two states had such a law. Now, about 100 cities and counties have made it illegal for employers to request a criminal history and 9 have removed the conviction history from their applications, dependent upon residency […]


Update on Ban the Box Laws

With the support of federal and local governments in many communities, the National Employment Law Project recently reported that more than half of the country’s population is living in a ban-the-box jurisdiction. 24 states and over 100 local jurisdictions have implemented some form of the law and 9 states have now removed the criminal conviction […]


When Banning One Kind of Discrimination Results in Another

As of December 2015, 24 states and the District of Columbia have required employers to ban the box in some form. This followed President Obama removing the box on federal government employment applications. But, according to new studies, the ban may be causing harm to those it seeks to help. By eliminating access to an […]


When Banning One Kind of Discrimination Results in Anothe

So-called ban-the-box policies—which prevent employers from asking about a candidate’s criminal history until later on in the hiring process—aim to help people that have been previously incarcerated to more easily enter the labor market. President Obama “banned the box” on federal-government employment applications last year, and as of December 2015, 24 states and the District of Columbia […]




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